Assessment Report

 

 

Level 3 Agricultural and Horticultural Science 2021

Standards 91530  91531  91532

Part A: Commentary

Candidates generally selected primary products which were either significant to their local area or to New Zealand. This selection allowed them to collect up-to-date, relevant data and ideas from publications to support their examination answers, as they clearly participated in fieldtrips to enhance understanding of their selected primary products.

Candidates who took their time to unpack the questions provided responses that showed that they understood the requirements of these achievement standards.

Most candidates wrote a well-considered response within the space available in the examination paper. Those who wrote on many ‘extra’ pages generally did not write any more mark worthy material.

Candidates have taken the advice to not rely on previous year’s assessment schedules for their answers, in doing so they have produced more relevant responses to the questions in the current year’s examination.

Part B: Report on standards

91530: Demonstrate understanding of market forces affect supply of and demand for New Zealand primary products

Examinations

This examination was a single question with three parts. Candidates were to complete all parts. Candidates had the opportunity to select the market forces to use in their answers from a list provided. The questions asked candidates to respond to a market force that affected the supply of their first primary product, and then how a different market force affected the demand for their second primary product. They then used one of their primary products to answer the last question which was how market trends affected the supply of AND demand for their chosen primary product.

Observations

Candidates are generally studying primary products that are allowing them access to good supporting information / data. There are not many candidates now making primary product selections that limit their responses to the market forces.

Candidates are following the guidance offered in the assessment specifications and are using more up-to-date data to support their examples in their responses.

Grade awarding

Candidates who were awarded Achievement commonly:

  • had a basic understanding of the supply and demand forces on TWO primary products
  • had a basic understanding of the market forces
  • wrote short answers with very little supporting evidence / examples.

Candidates whose work was assessed as Not Achieved commonly:

  • had a basic understanding of the supply and demand forces on only ONE primary product, with a second possibly absent or weak
  • knew only some market forces, which did not allow them to answer all parts of the examination
  • wrote responses that lacked any supporting evidence / examples. 

Candidates who were awarded Achievement with Merit commonly:

  • wrote detailed responses of the impact of the supply and demand forces on their TWO chosen primary products
  • took care in selecting the market forces that applied best to their primary product
  • wrote responses that had supporting evidence and examples that demonstrated a clear understanding of the effect of the market force on their primary products.

Candidates who were awarded Achievement with Excellence commonly:

  • wrote a detailed response on how a market trend affected the supply of, and demand for, their chosen primary product
  • provided numerous examples of the identified market trend and used data where appropriate to support their response
  • made links to how a change in demand (due to the identified market trend) had implications or impacts on the supply of their chosen primary product
  • produced a well-structured and logical response.

91531: Demonstrate understanding of how the production process meets market requirements for a New Zealand primary product(s)

Examinations

This examination was a single question with three parts. Students were to complete all parts. The exam paper required the candidates to have knowledge of TWO market requirements for their chosen primary product, and one management practice growers / producers carry out to meet each of those market requirements. The candidates were then required to identify the significance of the chosen management practices in maximising profitability of their primary product. A clear link between the management practices (what farmers / producers do) and the market requirements (what markets want) was required for this examination.

Observations

Some students, who were obviously ‘off farms’, showed a good understanding of animal husbandry, and farming practices but failed to relate the management practices carried out in the production process to meeting the market requirements.

This examination paper allows for a wide range of primary products to be selected and answered by candidates. A detailed knowledge of the key market requirements is fundamental for the chosen primary product. Linking the market requirements and management practices is the requirement of this standard.

Candidates who had been on field trips and used the information included relevant and current quotes and data from farmers, orchardists and crop growers. In general, these candidates demonstrated a deep overall understanding of their selected primary product and hence obtained higher grades.

Grade awarding

Candidates who were awarded Achievement commonly:

  • understood the essential management practices growers carry out
  • provided general information on the production process of the chosen product and described market requirements
  • linked a management practice to a market requirement.

Candidates whose work was assessed as Not Achieved commonly:

  • provided very little or no information about market requirements for their chosen product
  • gave a partial explanation of the effect of a management practice on the market requirement of their chosen product
  • did not link management practices with market requirements.

Candidates who were awarded Achievement with Merit commonly:

  • used specific detail / data when explaining market requirements
  • explained management practices in detail, using data or specific detail
  • showed in-depth understanding of their selected management practices.

Candidates who were awarded Achievement with Excellence commonly:

  • produced chains of reasoning that were logical and clearly expressed, using correct data or specific detail
  • justified a management practice which had the largest overall impact on maximising profitability by meeting market requirements
  • provided specific details and data for their justification made in their discussion. 

 

91532:  Analyse a New Zealand primary production environmental issue

Examinations

This examination was a single question paper, with three parts. Students were given the opportunity to select a primary production system to use as their context for this examination.

Candidates were required to identify how the production of their primary product negatively impacts freshwater in New Zealand, as well as the negative social impacts from the production of the primary product.

Candidates were then required to identify courses of action that primary producers could carry out to further reduce the impact on freshwater in New Zealand, to allow for their production to be sustainable.

Observations

Some candidates continued to use out-dated evidence and examples from previous years’ assessment schedules that are not relevant to the current year’s environmental issue nor do they allow them to answer the questions fully.

For example, some candidates who used dairy farming as their chosen primary production system were using fencing off (significant) waterways as a course of action and used data from old assessment schedules. This course of action has already been completed on dairy farms. Candidates should be investigating other courses of action to further reduce the negative impacts from their primary production system.

Data and examples from the past five years should be used as supporting evidence, as this information is readily available and allows a more robust response from the candidates.

Candidates should be aware of a range of courses of action primary producers could use to reduce the negative environmental impacts from the production of their primary product.

Grade awarding

Candidates who were awarded Achievement commonly:

  • described negative environmental and social impacts of production systems on water. Most used Dairy, but there were examples from Kiwifruit and Sheep or Beef systems
  • made a statement or gave an example without using supporting facts and figures
  • had a basic understanding of a production system that had intensified
  • gave a course of action that could have mitigated negative impacts, but often not explained in depth or did not have accurate facts or figures to support it.

Candidates whose work was assessed as Not Achieved commonly:

  • used courses of action not relevant to the question or had no real relevance to a specified production system
  • used supporting data from the previous year’s assessment schedules that was not relevant to this year’s question
  • had little or no understanding of the issue of water use in New Zealand primary production or a suitable solution.

 Candidates who were awarded Achievement with Merit commonly:

  • had a detailed understanding of negative environmental and social impacts that their chosen primary production systems contributed to in relation to water
  • understood how their primary production system could mitigate negative effects with at least one course of action explained
  • produced a well-planned and easy to understand response.

Candidates who were awarded Achievement with Excellence commonly:

  • showed a detailed understanding of the negative environmental and social impacts that production systems had in relation to water, with lots of relevant examples and figures to support their response
  • provided facts and figures that were appropriate and supported their response
  • justified a course of action with good examples and statements of how the course of action would not just reduce the negative environmental and social impacts, but also allow for economic prosperity
  • reasoned how carrying out their chosen course of action would ensure their business was sustainable into the future
  • provided a well written, easy to understand response with little excess text or data, or examples.  

 

Agricultural and Horticultural Science subject page

 

Previous years' reports

2020 (PDF, 168KB)

2019 (PDF, 250KB)

2018 (PDF, 98KB)

2017 (PDF, 45KB)

2016 (PDF, 45KB)

 
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