Assessment Report

Level 2 Latin 2021

Standards 91194  91195

Part A: Commentary

These achievement standards involve translating adapted Latin text of medium complexity into English, demonstrating understanding, and interpreting adapted Latin text of medium complexity, demonstrating understanding.

Candidates are advised to read the introduction carefully to get the context before starting the translation and the interpretation of the text. In the provided glossary, there is much more information than just the meaning of the words. Successful candidates used the vocabulary list to establish the part of speech and relevant information (such as declension, conjugation, irregular formation).

High performing candidates distinguished the meanings of words that superficially looked similar (such as aderat from adsum and adeas from adeo). These candidates also showed a clear understanding of how verb tense is expressed in Latin.

Candidates who gave low-scoring answers often demonstrated singular / plural errors.

When providing Latin evidence in questions that require this, candidates are reminded to restrict that evidence to only the relevant word(s), not the whole sentence.

 

Part B: Report on Standards

91194:  Translate adapted Latin text of medium complexity into English, demonstrating understanding

Examinations

The translation paper required candidates to translate a passage of Latin text accurately into English. A glossary was provided, and candidates were expected to display knowledge of Latin syntax and grammar up to and including Curriculum Level 7 in their translations. The passage of approximately 150 words was of narrative prose based on authentic Latin, adapted to conform to the requirements of Level 7.

Observations

Identification of subordinate clauses with the subjunctive was inconsistent. Comparative adverbs proved to be challenging and identifying nominative and accusative nouns (especially 3rd declension plural) proved problematic.

Latin idioms such as multi et graves (two adjectives linked by a conjunction rendered without the conjunction in English) were not widely recognised.

Familiarity with these aspects may help to improve performance.

Grade awarding

Candidates who were awarded Achievement commonly:

  • identified prepositional phrases and translated them correctly, such as ad filios
  • correctly linked participles with nouns, such as nauarchi and inclusi
  • identified that audite was an imperative.

Candidates who were awarded Not Achieved commonly:

  • confused words, e.g, feras ‘you bring’ with feris ‘wild beasts’, even when the context made this impossible.
  • did not recognise singular and plural nouns, e.g, that nauarchi was plural
  • did not identify person endings for verbs, e.g. that videtis was second person plural.

Candidates who were awarded Achievement with Merit commonly:

  • consistently identified singular and plural in nouns, for example recognizing that iudices, parentibus, matres and liberorum were plural, while ostium, carnifex and ictu were singular
  • were able to recognise and correctly render tenses, such as damnati sunt as perfect (passive) and dabis as future
  • rendered imperfect tenses in a way that reflected a continuous or habitual action in the past, such as orabant as were begging
  • recognised that dabatur was passive, so that the final sentence of paragraph 2 was best rendered as ‘And so money was given to Sextius.’

Candidates who were awarded Achievement with Excellence commonly:

  • identified that diutius and saepius were comparative adverbs
  • translated Latin infinitives as English participles where appropriate, such as adire as ‘from visiting’ rather than ‘to visit’ after prohibentur, thus providing a translation into good English
  • correctly interpreted that both obiectum iri and posse were infinitives in reported speech dependent on declaravit.

 


 

91195:  Interpret adapted Latin text of medium complexity, demonstrating understanding

Examinations

The examination consisted of a narrative text of approximately 150 words divided into three paragraphs with four questions attached to each paragraph. Candidates were expected to interpret in detail the content and grammar of the passage.

The passage was based on an authentic Latin text adapted to conform to the requirements of Level 7 of the Latin curriculum. A glossary was provided.

Observations

Specific answers to questions focused on the text are crucial. Questions often have several parts therefore candidates should attempt all parts. Not every part of the text provides an answer to a question.

Candidates are advised to pay close attention to the requirements needed for Latin evidence. They should give all and only the required material.

Successful candidates were confident with grammar, whereas candidates who struggled often provided verb terminology for nouns and vice versa. Attention to these matters may lead to improvement in performance.

Grade awarding

Candidates who were awarded Achievement commonly:

  • understood the concept of singular / plural – for example that the boy was given only one horse
  • understood how numbers work in Latin and were able to answer Q1 (b) successfully
  • correctly recognised prepositional phrases, such as in Hispania
  • recognised that eductum esse was passive, but did not recognise that it was perfect.

Candidates who were awarded Not Achieved commonly:

  • made mistakes when looking up words, e.g. regii does not come from rex, regis, but from regius, -a, -um and Numidiarum = of the Numidians, not of Numidia
  • mistook singular for plural and vice versa, such as thinking that there was only one elephant in line 1
  • did not identify peditum in Q1 (d) as plural.

Candidates who were awarded Achievement with Merit commonly:

  • realised that the passage began with two ablative absolutes that were linked
  • when translating specific Latin phrases, they reflected the case, e.g. regii generis ‘of royal lineage’
  • showed verb tense accuracy by reflecting the difference, for example, in the tense of esset and fuisset for 2(a)
  • rendered participles correctly, especially present participles such as lacrimans.

Candidates who were awarded Achievement with Excellence commonly:

  • recognised that both dimitti and vendi were dependent on iussit
  • recognised that Latin adjectives without a noun can have specific translation, such as multa alia – many other things
  • recognised the use of the dative in subsidio
  • handled the connecting relative pronoun easily and in natural English.

Latin subject page

Previous years' reports

2020 (PDF, 271KB)

2019 (PDF, 92KB)

2018 (PDF, 86KB)

2017 (PDF, 42KB)

 
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