US31025

Present simple information on an everyday familiar topic (EL)

Show: All English Language exemplars

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Grade: High Achieved

Commentary
Learner work

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For Achieved, the learner needs to present simple information on a familiar everyday topic.

This involves:

  • using learnt language patterns with some evidence of connected discourse
  • speaking audibly and comprehensibly, although pauses, hesitations, errors and inconsistencies may occur
  • using conventions appropriate to the delivery of information.

This learner has presented simple information about Chinese New Year.

The presentation is appropriate to the topic, and uses learnt language patterns in the present tense such as ‘What is…?’, ‘Chinese New Year is…’, ‘We usually celebrate…’ and ‘I really like…’. Connected discourse is evidenced by the use of simple conjunctions, such as ‘or’, ‘so’, ‘because’ and ‘after’ to link ideas, as well as the relative pronoun ‘which’.

The presentation is audible and can be understood throughout. There are occasional inconsistencies in pronunciation, e.g. ‘standing’, ‘throwing’, and grammatical structures, e.g. ‘on my grandmother’s house’, ‘such like’, ‘for a long time ago’), but these do not obscure meaning. The pace of delivery is maintained, with only occasional rephrasing, e.g. ‘for the new, for the whole year’, ‘photos that we, how we celebrate’.

Presentation conventions, notably eye contact and gesture, are used appropriately and consistently throughout. Verbal strategies are used, such as direct address to the audience (‘Those of you who are wondering why we eat a lot of sticky foods…’) and a rhetorical question (‘Have you ever had a special event that you can spend your time with your family or friends?’).

Grade: Achieved

Commentary
Learner work

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For Achieved, the learner needs to present simple information on a familiar everyday topic.

This involves:

  • ensuring the presentation contains simple information appropriate to the topic
  • using learnt language patterns with some evidence of connected discourse
  • speaking audibly and comprehensibly, although pauses, hesitations, errors and inconsistencies may occur
  • using conventions appropriate to the delivery of information.

The learner has presented simple information about how he uses his laptop.

The presentation is appropriate to the topic and uses repeated language patterns such as ‘I like to use…’, ‘I use…’, and ‘I like watching’. Connected discourse is evidenced by the use of simple conjunctions, such as ‘and’, ‘but’ and ‘because’ to link ideas, as well as a subordinating conjunction ‘if’.

The presentation is audible and can be understood throughout. Pronunciation is clear, and intonation and stress are used. Errors occur in lexical features, e.g. ‘sometime’, ‘watch video’, and grammatical structures, notably verb forms, e.g. ‘I needs…’, ‘can gives me’, and tenses, e.g. ‘what I needed’, ‘knew what I am going to learn’, but these do not obscure meaning. The pace of delivery is maintained, with only one occurrence of rephrasing (‘My laptop is one, I like to use…’).

Presentation conventions are used appropriately, notably eye contact, although there is a time lag between spoken content and slideshow changes. Verbal strategies are used, including direct address to the audience, e.g. ‘You know what?’, and a humorous question at the conclusion.

Grade: Low Achieved

Commentary
Learner work

Watch the video

For Achieved, the learner needs to present simple information on a familiar everyday topic.

This involves:

  • ensuring the presentation contains simple information appropriate to the topic
  • using learnt language patterns with some evidence of connected discourse
  • speaking audibly and comprehensibly, although pauses, hesitations, errors and inconsistencies may occur
  • using conventions appropriate to the delivery of information.

This learner has presented simple information on Tết, the Vietnamese New Year.

The presentation is appropriate to the topic and uses learnt language patterns in the present tense, such as ‘It is the most important celebration…’, ‘It is an occasion for…’, ‘Vietnamese believe…’.

There is sufficient evidence of connected discourse in the use of simple conjunctions, such as ‘and’, ‘so’ and ‘because’ to link ideas, as well as pronoun reference (e.g. ‘This is…’, ‘which’).

The presentation is audible and can generally be understood. Occasional mispronunciation of words and phrases, e.g. ‘prepare’, ‘church’, ‘hope’, and lack of intonation require some effort by the listener to comprehend. Grammatical and lexical inconsistencies occur, e.g. ‘It take places’, ‘to enjoyment’, ‘with brightly decorate the colour lanterns’, ‘they are decorate’), but these do not obscure meaning. The pace of delivery is maintained throughout.

Some presentation conventions are used appropriately. Reference to the slideshow is sufficiently balanced by eye contact with the audience.

For a more secure Achieved, the learner could use clear pronunciation more consistently, as well as more presentation conventions, such as body language and verbal strategies.

 

 
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